April 23, 2013
The future of publishing

In another guest blog from writer Errol Martin, he talks about the future of publishing and its gradual shift from print to digital.  With the rise of iPads and Kindles and many people opting to read their literature digitally, what does this hold for the publishing world and can aspiring writers take advantage of this trend?

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20 million iPads were sold last Christmas so even if only 10% of that market download books that's still an enormous amount of people who have access to your writing and as author David Baldicci recently said "Content is king."

There is no getting away from the fact that the future is digital and although the written word will survive, the way people get access to it is changing. There is Kindle direct publishing, through Amazon but publishing on Kindle requires that you format your manuscript so that it can be read digitally on all devices such as iPhones, tablets etc.

You can stick your book in a virtual shop like Amazon but unless people know who you are your book will stay on a virtual shelf gathering virtual dust. Then comes the price. You don't want to set the price too high and at the same time you don't want to lower your standards and sell it too cheap. Off course, like with any publisher you do have to pay Amazon royalties and go about copy righting your work but at least it gets published and you don't have to go through literary agents and traditional publishers.

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Recently 17 year old Welsh school girl, Beth Reekles was on television, described as the Dickens of the iPad and her book The Kissing Booth was read by 9 million people on Watt Pad before being snapped up by Random House publishing.

Everyone apparently has a book inside of them so hopefully these guidelines will help you achieve your aim and get published.

Good luck....